Ignacio Ipiña

His Paintings

During the decade of the 50s the influence of the School of Vallecas it started to reach to northern painters. The Group “La pajarita” in Vitoria, and the Group “El suizo” in Bilbao, collecting its heritage, incorporating it into their pictorial ideas which are open to any contribution it intends bolder and air fresh for art. Such was the need. They were very severe times; also for art. Any interpretation output more correct costumbrist risked being labeled as too out of place and therefore apart from the very few opportunities that an artist could aspire to exhibit his work.

A few years ago, in the mid-forties, Ignacio Ipiña is starting his artistic career playing with the landscapes of Orduña and Délica. He accompanies Juan Baysala, from which he receives a solid foundation in the composition of the picture. Later into the 50s, he befriends the painter of Alava, Florentino Fernández de Retana, with whom he will travel and paint the landscapes of Estella.

Ipiña never belonged to a school, and, as he said, was never Reaper “ism” one, which did not stop that, in the process of training as a painter, he received the influence, no doubt through Baysala and Retana, of Vallecas current, school that eclectic enough to count in their ranks with the free spirits of those years.

During the decade of the 50s the influence of the School of Vallecas it started to reach to northern painters. The Group “La pajarita” in Vitoria, and the Group “El suizo” in Bilbao, collecting its heritage, incorporating it into their pictorial ideas which are open to any contribution it intends bolder and air fresh for art. Such was the need. They were very severe times; also for art. Any interpretation output more correct costumbrist risked being labeled as too out of place and therefore apart from the very few opportunities that an artist could aspire to exhibit his work.
A few years ago, in the mid-forties, Ignacio Ipiña is starting his artistic career playing with the landscapes of Orduña and Délica. He accompanies Juan Baysala, from which he receives a solid foundation in the composition of the picture. Later into the 50s, he befriends the painter of Alava, Florentino Fernández de Retana, with whom he will travel and paint the landscapes of Estella.
Ipiña never belonged to a school, and, as he said, was never Reaper “ism” one, which did not stop that, in the process of training as a painter, he received the influence, no doubt through Baysala and Retana, of Vallecas current, school that eclectic enough to count in their ranks with the free spirits of those years.
His pictorial evolution was determined by his experiences. Cubism in the composition, Expressionism as a tool to project feelings, critical realism of its landscapes, form a base containing clear traits derived from the School of Vallecas, but the power and strength in both the stroke and color, volumes built by patches applied generously, mostly purple, and a historical and social significance in the treatment of his subjects made his painting win in personality.
When Ipiña founds the landscape that awaited him, stain the canvas with generous juiciness in the substantial and vigorously, printed color light to generate tenderness, bleakness or drama within a rigorous composition, wherein creating something so intangible and, yet, as existent as is the atmosphere, fills the picture with fullness.
In moments where the painter enters sociologically interpreting the landscape, makes the color with calligraphic strokes, in opposite directions or intersecting on fresh paint and traces marked by wide, long and broken brushstrokes. Indicates a calligraphy decided, fast and spontaneous gesture.
His office is perceptible in the balance of volumes and spaces, cubist influence, and in the rotunda firmly expressionist line, made from color, while the light plays an almost life-giving role of romantic inspiration.
Once Ignacio Ipiña decided that an item should be interpreted, focused on it, not painted without more, studying, documenting, listened to witnesses and collected their feelings. The rationale for their work should include a historical aspect besides aesthetic. It is for this reason that in most cases his exhibitions have been thematic.
Thus, Ipiña adapted the records of his palette to play with consistency successive issues that he faced, making a personal way but always respecting the essence of the landscape and trying to project its atmosphere to the canvas. The industrial world of the left bank of the Nervion, the “machine-populace”, need a leaden air, the coolant should smell. The low tide in Urdaibai must appease the most indomitable spirit. The seal of the artist is maintained but dominates the historical and aesthetic appearance of the themes. Bilbao and Salamanca. Ria, valleys, electricity from a castillian storm or the fog of the marshland prevail and presented recognizable, reinterpreted by the artist but authentic in their message. Thus his paintings escape the documentary story to raise scenarios archetypes of nature to get into its soul and collect its essence.
Ipiña defined his painting as follows:
“My painting style is not easily definable. The reason is that I have not had another teacher that nature seeking to commune with her. In any case, it is clear that I am a figurative landscaper with tendency to muralism and wide viewing angle.
In the landscape I always look toreconcile with nature, but I know that man leaves his mark on it, and try to meet these people, their lives, their way of thinking. And all this, of course, is reflected on the canvas. I want to make an expressionist painting, but there are certain landscapes that dominate me and that the heart that interprets and plasma. However, I do not paint nor describe the nature, the landscape as the eyes see, let alone with photographic approach, but the reworked the recess from herself. Then my landscape is born.
I’m not part of any school nor a Reaper any “ism”. My aspiration is to be myself as much as they relate me with relatives. From an angle constructive my rationality leads me to admire the cubist management schemes especially in the composition. Similarly, I feel like myself the expressionism able to broadly communicate emotions. I also like some results of metaphysical art worlds presented in a beautiful loneliness akin to romantic visions.
All this makes my figuration resulting syncretic, disparate elements to be present but are always treated under the premises of strength and power. “
Ignacio Ipiña

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